Announcement: We’re moving!

Hello faithful readers,

We’re moving!

Beginning today, the Khayrallah Program and the Lebanese in North Carolina Project will be broadening its focus to include a nation-wide perspective on the Lebanese Diaspora-logo-01Lebanese community living in the United States. The new endeavor is called the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies. Operated through NC State University under the Directorship of Dr. Akram Khater, this represents a major step in the work we’ve accomplished over the past 4 years, and paves the way for exciting work to come.

We began with a focus on North Carolina. Thank you to all who generously supported our efforts. Now, we’ll be using what we learned in North Carolina and applying those efforts, networks, and stories to a much larger context.

Please head to our new site for all information including blog posts now under “News,” details on the monthly newsletter, events, awards, and other work.

Our Facebook, Twitter and YouTube pages will all be re-branded to reflect this change. We will continue to use these platforms to share information and to learn more from our widening community!

 

 

What death certificates tell us about the lives of Lebanese

This is a guest post by Margie Merod, Assistant Director.

The goal of the Khayrallah Program is to shed light on the important contribution of Lebanese-Americans. Beginning with a focus on North Carolina, we’ve accomplished that by conducting interviews, archiving family photos and movies, and creating cultural projects like a documentary and museum exhibit to showcase all that the community has done over the last century. Last year, we began investigating death certificates as yet another primary source that could help us understand the whole picture of the community. We started with certificates from North Carolina, but we quickly moved to include many other states, providing a wider lens through which to view Lebanese-Americans. Check out our April newsletter for our first article on our research.

We collected North Carolina death certificates from 1909-1975 and have now identified 18 more states with these records published online. So far, we’ve finished collecting records from Tennessee and Kentucky. Through death certificates, we’ll gather statistical and genealogical information about first wave immigrants represented in all these states. Statistical information such as age, location, and cause of death let us examine the impact of immigration on the health of individuals and the community by comparative study with the general public in the United States and Lebanon. Genealogical information such as name, country residence, and birthplace will tell us about immigration patterns and family relationships within this country.

Here’s an example of a death certificate and some highlights of the great information found in each document.

Naifeh_Lizzie1918

The Naifeh family appears in both state-based collections with family members in Covington, Tennessee and Hickman, Kentucky. Lizzie Naifeh’s death certificate is one of very few that gives a specific birth location in Lebanon.

We have also begin mapping the concentration of Lebanese in each of the 19 states examined. Mapping will allow us to display this important information in an interactive and searchable format for the general public, but also for researchers and members of the community of Lebanese-Americans. As we broaden our scope, these projects will bring country-wide resonance. This project will take about six-months and yield a wealth of information that we look forward to sharing with the public!

Event tomorrow: Special Announcement for the Project!

Don’t miss it!

TOMORROW! Tuesday, October 14
4:00 pm

The Dorothy and Roy Park Alumni Center
2450 Alumni Drive • NC State Centennial Campus

Chancellor W. Randolph Woodson and Dean Jeffery P. Braden cordially invite you to join them for a celebration on the occasion of a landmark announcement for NC State University and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHASS)

Kindly reply by Wednesday, October 8, 2014 and call 919.515.5973 with questions

Upcoming Event: Lebanese-American author, Joseph Geha

“Is there an Us?”

Lebanese-American author, Joseph Geha

Monday, October 27 at 7:00 pm
NC State University, Riddick Hall, Room 451 (Department of Physics building)

JoeGehaJoe Geha will speak about immigration, ethnicity and identity and whether, after more than a century of Lebanese immigration and naturalization, can we still say there is an “us”?

He will explore–through discussion and a few brief selected readings from both his fiction and non-fiction–some of the changes that the immigration process imposes, and what of “us” is left when it’s through.

Geha is a professor-emeritus at Iowa State University, is the author of two books, Through and Through: Toledo Stories, one of the first books of modern Arab-American fiction, and Lebanese Blonde, a novel. He is from Zahlé, Lebanon.

 

Upcoming Event: Special Celebration for the Project!

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Tuesday, October 14
4:00 pm

The Dorothy and Roy Park Alumni Center
2450 Alumni Drive • NC State Centennial Campus

Chancellor W. Randolph Woodson and Dean Jeffery P. Braden cordially invite you to join them for a celebration on the occasion of a landmark announcement for NC State University and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences (CHASS)

Kindly reply by Wednesday, October 8, 2014 and call 919.515.5973 with questions

First month at Tryon Palace!

After a successful opening reception and great visitor numbers over the last few weeks, Cedars in the Pines exhibit is hitting its one-month anniversary at Tryon Palace in New Bern.

Cedars in the Pines explores experiences and history of Lebanese immigrants who have made North Carolina their home since the 1880s. The exhibit is divided into three sections: Journeys, Belonging, and Being.

If you haven’t made your way to the exhibit, it’ll be at Tryon until December 14. Check out the great coverage by TWC News. Let us know how you enjoy it!